Nefertiti

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Nofretete war die Hauptgemahlin des Königs Echnaton und lebte im Jahrhundert v. Chr. Bekannt wurde die Königin durch die Büste der Nofretete aus Kalkstein und Gips, die im Ägyptischen Museum im Nordkuppelsaal des Neuen Museums in Berlin. Nofretete (Aussprache: [nɔfʁəˈteːtə]) (in anderen Sprachen meist „Nefertiti“, ägyptisch jeroenspierenburg.nl, ursprüngliche Aussprache etwa Nafteta) war die. Nefertiti bezeichnet: ein alternativer Name für die ägyptische Königin Nofretete und die Büste der Nofretete; ein Jazz-Album von Miles Davis; siehe Nefertiti. Nefertiti lived around BC - BC in Egypt, and was the wife of Akhenaten (Amenhotep IV). She became co-regent, gave birth to 6 daughters and died. Many translated example sentences containing "Nefertiti" – German-English dictionary and search engine for German translations.

Nefertiti

Nefertiti - Davis, Miles: jeroenspierenburg.nl: Musik. Nefertiti lived around BC - BC in Egypt, and was the wife of Akhenaten (Amenhotep IV). She became co-regent, gave birth to 6 daughters and died. Finden Sie perfekte Stock-Fotos zum Thema Nefertiti sowie redaktionelle Newsbilder von Getty Images. Wählen Sie aus erstklassigen Inhalten zum Thema.

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August View on Twitter. Januar Die gesamte Königsfamilie wird auf diesen Darstellungen stets durch die Strahlen der Sonnenscheibe des Aton beschützt. Marc Gabolde nahm an, dass Nofretete mindestens bis kurz vor Echnatons Tod gelebt hatte. Likes Bei der Inthronisation wurde ein neuer Name angenommen. Felsengrab Nr. Bisher Beste Spielothek in Strassham finden über Demobauern und Innovationsakteure in den regionalen und nationalen Zentren beteiligt. Nofretete bei einer Opfergabe Brooklyn Museum. Followers 1, Nefertiti Nefertiti

Nefertiti Video

Secrets d'Histoire - Néfertiti, mystérieuse reine d’Égypte (Intégrale) Gad, S. Bisherige Vermutungen datierten das Todesjahr auf v. Die Autorin erzählt auch die Geschichte der Büste, von ihrer Entstehung bei Thutmosis über ihre Nefertiti und ihren Diebstahl aus Ägypten, und über den aktuellen Restitutionsstreit zwischen Ägypten und Deutschland. Die berühmte blaue Krone auf der Büste ist die eigens für Nofretete entwickelte Hohe Krone und bildet ein Gegenstück zum Chepresch Arena Casino, einen Bitminer.Io Scam. Images of Beauty from Ancient Egypt. Tatort Ägypten: Der Fall Nofretete. Juli im Internet ArchiveInhaltsangabe Das übergeordnete Ziel von NEFERTITI ist es, ein EU-weites, hochgradig vernetztes Netzwerk von Demonstrations- und Pilotbetrieben aufzubauen, das den. Das Projekt NEFERTITI (Project Networking European Farms to Enhance Cross Fertilisation and Innovation Uptake Through Demonstration) ist ein einzigartiges​. Nefertiti - Davis, Miles: jeroenspierenburg.nl: Musik. Nefertiti: Egypt's Sun Queen | Tyldesley, Joyce | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. History, and the Collection of Classical Antiquities. The famous bust of the Ancient Egyptian queen Nefertiti is the showpiece exhibit in the Neues Museum.

Hawass also claimed that Thutmose had created the eye, but it was later destroyed. The artists said the project, called Body of Nefertiti, was an attempt to pay homage to the bust.

According to Wildung, it showed "the continued relevance of the ancient world to today's art. In , the German press described the bust as their new monarch, personifying it as a queen.

As the "'most precious The bust became an influence on popular culture, with Jack Pierce 's make-up work on Elsa Lanchester 's iconic hairstyle in the film Bride of Frankenstein being inspired by it.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Ancient sculpture from Egypt. The iconic bust of Nefertiti is part of the Egyptian Museum of Berlin collection.

Right profile and front. Left profile and back. Retrieved 18 November Discovery Channel. Archived from the original on 5 January Retrieved 23 November Van der Perre, 'Nefertiti's last documented reference for now' F.

Seyfried ed. National Geographic Society. Retrieved 16 November The Ancient Egyptians for Dummies. The Guardian. Retrieved 21 November The New York Times.

Retrieved 15 November Spiegel Online. Retrieved 17 November The Times. Archived from the original on 1 March Retrieved 24 November Science News.

Archived from the original on 4 July Janson History of art: the Western tradition. Prentice Hall PTR. American Univ in Cairo Press.

Gardner's Art Through the Ages : the western perspective. Cengage Learning. Ancient Egypt. Mann, Berlin: Verlag Gebr. Der Spiegel. Tyldesley, Nefertiti: Egypt's sun queen , Viking, , p.

Discovery News. Retrieved 18 December Radiological Society of North America. Archived from the original on 5 November Science Daily. National Geographic News.

BBC News. Retrieved 22 November Archived from the original on 18 March The Independent. The Christian Science Monitor.

Smarthistory at Khan Academy. Retrieved 15 March New York Times. Al-Ahram Weekly Archived from the original on 16 September Archived from the original on 18 May Archived from the original on 8 October Anthes, Rudolph Breger, Claudia In Regina Schulte ed.

Berghahn Book. Siehr, Kurt G August In John Henry Merryman ed. Imperialism, Art and Restitution. Cambridge University Press. Silverman, David P.

Akhenaten and Tutankhamun: Revolution and Restoration. University of Pennsylvania, Museum of Archaeology. Tyldesley, Joyce Nefertiti's Face: The Creation of an Icon.

I could have accepted Nefertiti as a villain only if she had been better written. None of the characters in this book are well developed and I guess that is what really bothers me.

Everyone is entitled to their own version of history. Not every historical fiction needs to be historically accurate. Nevertheless, one should give his vision to a good editor if one is going to publish his book- or at least read it a few times.

This book is filled with illogical plot twists and moralizing. I'm not saying that the author didn't try to breathe life in this story, there are even a few really good lines in this book.

However, for a novel this long, one expects more. This is one of those books that have not lived up to its potential mostly because they are not well developed.

Even if I ignore the fact that the story does not sound plausible historically, I cannot ignore the fact that it has its weaknesses, a fair share of them actually.

I don't expect it to be a historical book, it's after all fiction but many things just don't sound right.

Here are my main issues with this book: 1. The novel does not have a feeling of a time different from our own. The cultural undertones in it are for most parts the modern western culture.

The historical facts and information that are in the novel are not woven into story in a natural and effortless way like in some other historical fictions.

I had a feeling they are there just to be there. There was some progress made into this direction. Regrettably, it was towards the end of the novel.

Again, I did not expect the novel to feel really authentic, but I did expect it to pay more attention to the way things might have been.

Perhaps we cannot reconstruct a culture so far away in time, but you can accomplish portraying a culture that feels a bit different.

I mean you can, if you can write. There is no attention to detail. Who edited this book? How can a woman be pregnant for two years? The characterization is not consistent, nor is the story itself.

Can Nefertiti influence her husband or not? I doubt even author knew answers to some of the questions that appear as you read.

If you are to keep your characters mysterious, you have to add some dept to them. One more thing that comes to my mind: you can not heal seriously ill people with mint tea.

This book desperately needed good editing. That's too bad, because it could have been much better. Do all the characters have to be so one-dimensional, so that a protagonist can be more sympathetic?

The author did try to add some dept to them as the novel progresses but it was not really successful. Again, there is no attention to details.

Sentimentality that appears occasionally does not help, rather just the opposite. The sort of action that can make you turn pages with interest begins at the end or towards the end- It was about page that I began to be interested.

That may not be the case with everybody, but really for me only half of the novel is any good. By any good I mean interesting, not even particularly good literature.

My recommendation is- read this book if you have nothing better to read or do. It could be a decent read if you're type that doesn't pay great attention to detail when you read.

You might like it if you don't know much about history or don't care about characters development. I can imagine someone liking it, but not very much.

Honestly, this book didn't appeal to me at all. I remember Nefertiti as a shallow and illogical novel. I have no desire to reread it.

One star. Sep 22, Caitlin rated it it was amazing Shelves: books-i-loved , favorites , historical-fiction , egypt , adult-fiction. Why have I waited so long to read this book?

No need for a lengthy review. I don't have anything to say that isn't already said in the thousands of reviews this book has.

I devoured this book in about 24 hours. It was addicting. Egypt, BCE. Fifteen year old Nefertiti and her thirteen year old sister, Mutnodjmet, are the daughters and only children of the Vizier Ay, brother to the Queen of Egypt, Tiye.

The prince of Egypt and Pharaoh's heir, Tuthmosis, is dead - possibly murdered by his younger and much less liked brother, Amunhotep. Both Ay and Tiye need Nefertiti to control Amunhotep, who talks wildly of worshipping Aten, the Sun, over all other gods, and has grandiose and impractical dreams.

But Nefertiti is far from secure in her position as Chief Wife. Amunhotep's first wife, Kiya, has given him a son, and Nefertiti exerts all her cunning to keep her upper hand - which of necessity involves aiding Amunhotep in his wild schemes.

Becoming king of Lower Egypt, he uses the army to strip Amun's temples and high priests of all their gold and treasures, forces them to convert to the worship of Aten, and as soon as his father dies and he becomes Pharaoh of all Egypt, uses the army to build a brand new city in the desert to worship the sun.

The Hittites are encroaching on Egyptian territory; Amunhotep - who becomes Akhenaten - becomes more and more paranoid and obsessive; and Kiya's father, the Vizier and now High Priest of Aten, Panahesi, scheming to raise his family higher.

Nefertiti, her father and the dowager queen Tiye are entirely occupied with politics and placating Akhenaten, who refuses to send troops to protect Egypt's borders.

Akhenaten and Nefertiti's ambitions raise them to god status, as their statues and likenesses decorate temples and buildings like no rulers before, and Akhenaten becomes more and more unstable.

Caught between them all is Nefertiti's sister Mutny, torn between sisterly love and a yearning for her own life free of the palace and its dangers.

Everything reaches boiling point when Akhenaten does something incredibly stupid, and Egypt itself teeters on the brink of ruin.

I was surprised to find that Mutny narrates this tale, since it is titled "Nefertiti", but it was a good move on Moran's part - Mutny is a quiet, in-the-background character but she is a much more sympathetic character, has a wiser perspective because she's not blinded by Nefertiti's ambition and power, and is much more relatable because she's more humble.

Nefertiti, as presented in this book anyway, is too lofty a personage to get inside her head. Where this novel works is with Mutnodjmet and her love for General Nakhtmin, her observations and conscience.

She's knowable and likeable for all that she's coming from a drastically different culture. As a window into Egyptian culture in the 14th century BCE, it also works quite well, but it never feels truly authentic.

There's a modern touch at work, coming through in Moran's prose, that makes it read more like a fantasy book set in a "different" world, than a work of historical fiction.

Since there's not a whole lot to go on, research-wise, Moran has done well to reconstruct the world and its people, but not being an Egyptian history scholar at all, I can't vouch for its accuracy and there are probably better books in this regard.

While I did like the book, I also found it hard to get into at times. I had to force myself to sit down and finish it, and this comes down mostly to the style of prose - it's simple, it's readable, it's perfectly fine, but there was too much distance between me and the narrator.

The author never really immersed herself deeply enough, leaving the book to skim the surface of an arresting tale. It's hard to pinpoint it any better than that.

The characters were no more familiar, understandable or knowable by the end than they were at the beginning. It was a tantalising taste, but I wanted the entire dish.

Mar 23, Trupti Dorge rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , i-own , review-copy. Tuthmosis, the older brother of Amunhotep is dead and the wise men of Egypt have concluded that Amunhotep has killed his brother for power, to become the pharaoh.

And as the author Michelle Moran puts it Whatever the truth, that night the crown prince, Tuthmosis, dies, and a new crown prince rose to take his place.

Her father is a vizier to the pharaoh, so we get to know both sides of politics. Nefertiti is very ambitious and is ready to assist the pharaoh in his heretic ambitious.

He destroys all the temples built for Amun and forbids his people from worshipping him. He builds an entirely new city called Amarna and glorifies himself and his queen Nefertiti by carving their statues and painting their faces everywhere.

Nefertiti does not stop Amunhotep because she realizes that it was the only opportunity to make herself immortal and be remembered through centuries.

Like the pharaoh, she turns a blind eye on the political unrest, encroaching enemies and devotes herself entirely to the pharaoh and her ambitions.

It is the story of her sister Mutnodjmet Mutny too. In fact I was surprised to find that the narrator is Mutny. She is the exact opposite of Nefertiti.

Where Nefertiti wants power, Mutny wants a quiet life in one of the villages, away from all the politics. The story and the backdrop are interesting; yes, but what brings life to the story are the characters.

I loved how author Michelle Moran has constructed a story around an era which is still not entirely explored.

Weaving a story around a civilization and characters as ancient as these, must have required a lot of research. Nefertiti is a good thriller and a good story which kept me up late turning the pages.

Rating: 4. View 1 comment. Apr 01, Christine rated it it was ok Shelves: poc-on-cover , minority-and-women-writers , historical-ancient-egypt.

It's not a bad book, but it's not Pauline Gedge. Narrator here is too much of a prefect princess. However, Moran does get points for research. Sep 15, Cfleff rated it did not like it.

Contrary to what some other reviewers have said, I found this to be a very poorly-researched book. While there is, of course, very little information available about the personalities of people who lived so long ago, there is certainly a good deal of information about this period and these people, from which one can draw some intelligent inferences about what they were like, as people.

And these characters simply do not fit the available historical data. Nefertiti, for example, is portrayed by M Contrary to what some other reviewers have said, I found this to be a very poorly-researched book.

Nefertiti, for example, is portrayed by Moran as ruthlessly seeking power at any cost - not a very likable person.

Yet she was much admired by the kings and ambassadors of surrounding countries; and her husband speaks of her "sweet voice" and "gentle hands" - hardly attributes of the kind of virago portrayed in this book!

And to me, when I look at the famous bust by the artist Thutmose, I see a woman who has seen a good deal of sadness - after all, at least four of her six daughters died before her, as well as her husband.

And as for her half- sister, Mutnodjmet, there is absolutely nothing whatsoever in the historical record to suggest that she was any sort of intellectual or that she had an altruistic bone in her body, let alone that she ever had any desire to become a physician.

On the contrary, if you want to picture either of these two sisters as a ruthless social-climber, I would nominate Mutnodjmet. Despite being born non-royal, the daughter of her father's second, lower-ranking wife, she managed to become queen by virtue of marrying Horemheb, usurper of the throne of Egypt at the end of the Eighteenth Dynasty!

I would say that that record speaks for itself! In short, I think this is a very poorly-researched book that doesn't do justice to a fascinating, colorful period in Egyptian history or the people who made it that way, filled with unrealistic, unlikable, two-dimensional characters.

If you're a fan of ancient Egypt and want a well-researched, accurate portrayal of Nefertiti and her life and times, check out C.

Dec 06, Lynn rated it liked it Recommends it for: people who are bored. At first the back cover had me ready to read when I saw "meticulously researched" stated by the Boston Globe's review on the back.

I tore through it in 9 hours because it was such an easy read. While the story was decent, I was rather disappointed. Although her character portrayal was good, she never really made me SEE Egypt.

It also lacked the one thing every other "meticulously researched" book on ancient Egypt lacks. If it was so w At first the back cover had me ready to read when I saw "meticulously researched" stated by the Boston Globe's review on the back.

If it was so well researched, then why the heck can't authors get that right? I also found inconsistencies in the 'research'.

I've independently studies Egypt my entire life, I doubt the author spent more than a year, two at most, researching.

Certain items she used in the story didn't even exist in Ancient Egypt. It was riddle with "ly". I was say, read it if you're bored.

Well, that's my two cents. View all 3 comments. Aug 18, Christine rated it it was amazing. I am still reeling from this delicious book! Power, royalty, wealth and a sweet love story all rolled into one, this book swept me up and did not put me down until the last page of the preview to the sequel.

Told through the eyes of Nefertiti's younger sister, Mutnodjmet, who was the exact opposite of her - but both were compelling and strong characters.

I couldn't help but liken Nefertiti to Anne Boleyn: both driven by their families and their own ambitions for power, both used religion to seal I am still reeling from this delicious book!

I couldn't help but liken Nefertiti to Anne Boleyn: both driven by their families and their own ambitions for power, both used religion to seal the fates of their relationships, and both supported and tolerated an unstable king, making foolish decisions along the way to hold on to their positions.

Mary Boleyn could be easliy compared to Mutnodjmet: both quietly beautiful and bound to their sister queens even though they were used and treated as servants, they each desired life outside of court and finally achieved that, but neither of them ever betrayed their families in the process, loyal to the end.

I could read this book over and over, it is one of my new favorites!! You never get to really know Nefertiti, or what she is thinking, but you do get to witness one whiny temper tantrum after another.

I lost count how many times Mutnodjmet had to break down and cry. Strangely Pharaoh's court seems to lack physicians until 13 year old Mutnodjmet arrives with her knowledge of healing I think a better title for this novel might have been, "Mutnodjmet, The Chief Wife's Sister.

Strangely Pharaoh's court seems to lack physicians until 13 year old Mutnodjmet arrives with her knowledge of healing herbs. I bet you didn't know how many ailments can be cured with Mint leaves.

I almost choked when Vizier Ay tells his 15 year old daughter Nefertiti on her wedding night, "you know what to do, right? This was eye rolling in extreme capacity.

To be fair there were a few dramatic moments, and I was curious as to how this soap opera would end. Still if I had known this was more or less a young adult romance novel, I would have skipped it.

Sep 23, AnnaMay rated it did not like it. Yuck yuck yuck. Sorry, I must not be in line with the New York best seller's list's standards.

What a very tedious book to get through. I kept reading, hoping it would redeem itself I'd never read an Egyptian novel and really wanted to enjoy it , but boy oh boy did it ever flop!

I'm definitely avoiding Moran's writing from hear on out. There are just too m Yuck yuck yuck. There are just too many other good books out there that I could be enjoying.

Sorry, Moran. We're not fit for each other :. Jul 16, Tasha rated it really liked it Shelves: historical-fiction , audio-reads. Another great story by Michelle Moran!

A good his fic: good story and I feel like I learned a lot about something I know very little about. Shelves: wall-bangers , bronze-agetobce-fiction , young-adult.

The plot revolves around the lives of two sisters, Nefertiti and Mutnodjmet. Since it is written in first person perspective from the point of view of Mutnodjmet, she is the protagonist and narrator, although in the setting in which she moves, Nefertiti is the focus of everyone's attention and the action of the story.

Most of the plot revolves around Nefertiti's scheming to hold onto her position and gain further power, and Mutnodjmet's struggle to break free from her sister's influence.

There a The plot revolves around the lives of two sisters, Nefertiti and Mutnodjmet. There are one or two plot twists The writing felt very linear, very simplistic, and definitely could have benefitted from a couple of sub-plots and a more subtle interweaving of various strands.

The language was rather basic, and there wasn't too much imagery apart from a very frequently repeated comparison of Mutnodjmet to a cat, because of her green eyes.

The story focuses character development and dialogue between characters, but regrettably the actual dialogue was very forced and stilted and didn't flow like a real conversation, and the quality of portrayal of the characters is debatable.

As a reader I was given the sense that the characters did have backgrounds, but these were never really explored at all in the story, at best they were referenced once or twice but no more, and certainly never exposed or fully explored.

The characters didn't feel fully formed, and lacked a certain subtlety and complexity of personality. The pathos just wasn't there - it's not always understandable why a character makes the decisions they do, a good author will weave the pathos so well that the readers can understand the reasoning even of loathsome characters, but here in this book the characters sometimes make decisions that we can't follow, and we're just supposed to accept that they made the decision because they're a bad character and that's what they do.

I also did not get the sense that the characters grow over the course of the book; they stay pretty much the same throughout.

Nefertiti does change her approach and reconcile to different policies in her governing of Egypt once her husband has been killed, but one doesn't get the feeling that she has been significantly affected by the disastrous events that have happened to her, that she feels regret or remorse or desperation, for example.

As Akhenaten's queen, she acts simply as she wishes to increase her own power and securing his rule and Aten worship is the most expedient way of achieving it at the time; as ruler of Egypt in her own right she returns to the worship of Amun and condemns without emotion her late husband's heresy, and again it seems as though this is simple expediency; she is still trying to hold onto power by the most expedient means, she just doesn't care whether it's through one set of policies or another.

I personally do not feel that the portrayal of the characters in this novel is true to their real life historical counterparts - the emotions just never seem to run to extremes, and neither does the plot really, whereas I feel that the real life people would have had a much bigger emotional stake in these earth-shattering events and a much stronger commitment and faith in their own personal choices.

Mutnodjmet is the protagonist, and yet she was bland and forgettable. She didn't really seem to have a character, and her only memorable trait was her knowledge of herbal remedies.

I didn't buy her romance with Nakhtmin at all; instead of developing the initial intrigue in a natural way, their relationship suddenly jumps from the barest hint of interest on the general's part, to Mutnodjmet agreeing to a union and expecting a baby.

She wasn't very fleshed out at all, and did not have much of a personality. Nakhtmin is dangerously close to becoming a stock designated love interest, i.

It is often mentioned that Ay, the father of the sisters, is the power behind the throne, but we never see scenes showing this, and why then does Egypt fall apart so badly if Ay is mostly in control of things?

Moran, by saying that Ay deals with most government affairs, shoots herself in the foot really, because we must then put the disasters of governance down to Ay's incompetence.

Likewise, we are told that Horemheb is military minded, ambitious, and not to be crossed. And yet his character does nothing in the book; he is betrayed, exiled, and imprisoned by Akhenaten and Nefertiti, and yet if his personality is as volatile as Mutnodjmet observes, why does he not then lash out in retribution?

Yet when Nefertiti has need of his services, he is willing to obey at the drop of a hat. Nefertiti is probably the character I'm most disappointed in as a portrayal.

I just don't find her terribly plausible. It's clear from the beginning that she is selfish, lazy, and ambitious, as well as possessive, but she's portrayed as being essentially good despite these character faults - we are told that all her actions in backing up Akhenaten's policies are for the greater good - she does it so that she can retain her favour with Akhenaten and influence towards him towards better policies, which she only does a handful of times towards the end of the book when disaster strikes the royal city anyway!

I don't believe that the historical Nefertiti, who was so deeply involved in her husband's schemes, could have taken the actions she did or have been a party to them without a serious belief and faith in Akhenaten's Aten worship and policies, perhaps naively and genuinely, or perhaps cruelly and deliberately.

Akhenaten, the heretical pharaoh himself, is presented in a slightly odd way. If ever there were a man in history whose workings of the mind were a mysterious fascination, it's Akhenaten.

It is obvious that here was a very highly complex and difficult to understand person, to some degree unfathomable. Moran's Akhenaten is very thinly sketched, and totally unsympathetic.

His motivations are entirely hidden, and he basically just acts like a petulant child, making irrational and unexplained illogical decisions just because.

I had no sympathy with the character at all, didn't really care when he died, and never understood why he did any of the things he did.

This was a pale shadow of other historical fiction portrayals of Akhenaten, such as Pauline Gedge's Twelfth Transforming in which the Pharaoh is fascinating yet terrible.

As for the historical accuracy, as a qualified Egyptologist I can tell you that it wasn't great. I won't list all the errors here, but I will cover a handful of points.

I didn't like the way Moran used the modern names of the cities instead of the ancient ones it just sounds so incongruous to have characters talking about "Thebes" and "Amarna" when we know the Egyptians would have called those cities "Waset" and "Akhetaten" , and she condensed Nefertiti's final two pregnancies into one by having her give birth to twin girls.

I was partially placated by the afterword in which Moran admits that Nefertiti never had twin girls, but she doesn't tell us why she did this.

Perhaps she wrote the final two pregnancies into a twin birth because she felt it would get boring if Nefertiti had to go through six births of girls in the book.

Moran goes on to say that other events are open to interpretation and that in those cases she has presented what she feels is the most probable version, for example, the question marks over whether Akhenaten ever shared a co-regency with his father, or whether Nefertiti ever reigned alone.

Moran decides that both did occur, but I am afraid I must disagree with her interpretations here and it is my professional opinion that neither is the most probable interpretation.

Certainly, we can't say definitively that Nefertiti was the same person as Smenkhare until we find the material evidence that proves this.

If we're going to be picky, Mutnodjmet, the queen of Pharaoh Horemheb, may not have even been the same person as Nefertiti's sister - whose name was actually Mutbenret - there's certainly no evidence for it, other than their names are spelt similarly in hieroglyphs.

I am really hoping that Moran can improve her storytelling, as she's chosen an interesting period of ancient Egyptian history to write about, but it just didn't hit the mark for me due to the poor writing quality.

Too often, Moran tells instead of shows, and towards the end of the novel it felt like the characters were swept along on the tide of events instead of reaching a logical conclusion.

I'd also like to see her flesh out her characters more and not shy away from giving her readers a complex plot.

Feb 28, Cam rated it really liked it. This is my first time reading this author I really enjoyed this historical fiction.

The book takes you from when Nefertiti was chosen to be the wife of the pharaoh of Egypt. The treachery that being in high power brought with it.

It was fun fact checking the events that took place during this time period while reading it. I look forward to reading more by this author.

Oct 06, AJ rated it it was ok Shelves: historical-fiction , biographical. Michelle Moran is no Philippa Gregory.

Her book seems to reach for it, bringing the idea of a historical and controversial queen to the readers intimacy with the relationship she has with her sister.

I will give her credit for the research involved which was probably a lot harder to procure than Tudor knowledge but then again, it warrants that half of what I am reading might be made up.

In fact, reading through a historical account of Nefertiti after completion of the book has left me wondering Michelle Moran is no Philippa Gregory.

In fact, reading through a historical account of Nefertiti after completion of the book has left me wondering where the author found her sources and I hope she can provide more details in the future.

Interesting opinions abound. Unfortunately for Moran, while she tries to gain the reader's interest she simply lacks the storyteller skill that Gregory has and she falls very short of the goal of having us care about these characters.

With "the other boelyn girl" i literally felt fear for Anne and I continued to turn the pages in dread. For Nefertiti political machinations and emotions are brief and quickly explained in a way that makes their events seem passive and without consequence.

I would have put this on my educational shelf but I'm just not certain I believe all the egyptian details within.

However I will say that the book did encourage me to do my own research on Nefertiti so I guess that is a worthwhile conclusion.

Oct 20, Natasa rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , ancient-egypt , nefertiti , owned-books. It was a time of change and just as Mut and Nefertiti were changing the whole Egyptian world was changing with them.

I applaud Michelle Moran for writing a novel on a woman is still for all intents and purposes an enigma to us.

As a result, little information is available on Nefertiti, but Moran used the most accepted theories available on her life to creating an unforgettable novel that will hook you from page one.

Readers also enjoyed. About Michelle Moran. Michelle Moran. Librarian Note: There is more than one author in the GoodReads database with this name. See this thread for more information.

Michelle Moran is the international bestselling author of six historical novels, including Madame Tussaud, which was optioned for a mini-series in Her books have been translated into more than twenty languages.

During her six years as a public high school teacher, she used her summers to travel around the world, and it was her experiences as a volunteer on archaeological digs that inspired her to write historical fiction.

In Michelle was married in India, inspiring her seventh book, Rebel Queen, which is set in the East. Her hobbies include hiking, traveling, and archaeology.

She is also fascinated by archaeogenetics, particularly since her children's heritages are so mixed.

But above all these things, Michelle is passionate about reading, and can often be found with her nose in a good book.

A frequent traveler, she currently resides with her husband, son, and daughter in the US. Books by Michelle Moran.

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Bisherige Vermutungen datierten das Todesjahr auf v. Dorothea Arnold hat daraus fünf verschiedene Darstellungstypen abgeleitet: [24]. View on Twitter. Der jüngere Stil setzte mit dem Umzug nach Achet-Aton ein und zeichnete sich einerseits durch eine Rückkehr zur konventionellen ägyptischen Frauendarstellung und andererseits durch neue charakteristische, individuelle Gesichtszüge aus. Tweets

Nefertiti's name, Egyptian Nfr. In fact, Tey's only connection with her was that she was the "nurse of the great queen" Nefertiti, an unlikely title for a queen's mother.

Nevertheless, this entire proposal is based on speculation and conjecture. It has also been proposed that Nefertiti was Akhenaten's full sister, though this is contradicted by her titles which do not include those usually used by the daughters of a Pharaoh.

Scenes in the tombs of the nobles in Amarna mention the queen's sister who is named Mutbenret previously read as Mutnodjemet.

The exact dates when Nefertiti married Akhenaten and became the king's Great Royal Wife are uncertain.

Their six known daughters and estimated years of birth were: [16] [13]. Nefertiti first appears in scenes in Thebes. In the damaged tomb TT of the royal butler Parennefer , the new king Amenhotep IV is accompanied by a royal woman, and this lady is thought to be an early depiction of Nefertiti.

The king and queen are shown worshiping the Aten. In the tomb of the vizier Ramose , Nefertiti is shown standing behind Amenhotep IV in the Window of Appearance during the reward ceremony for the vizier.

One of the structures, the Mansion of the Benben hwt-ben-ben , was dedicated to Nefertiti. She is depicted with her daughter Meritaten and in some scenes the princess Meketaten participates as well.

In scenes found on the talatat , Nefertiti appears almost twice as often as her husband. She is shown appearing behind her husband the Pharaoh in offering scenes in the role of the queen supporting her husband, but she is also depicted in scenes that would have normally been the prerogative of the king.

She is shown smiting the enemy, and captive enemies decorate her throne. In the fourth year of his reign, Amenhotep IV decided to move the capital to Akhetaten modern Amarna.

In his fifth year, Amenhotep IV officially changed his name to Akhenaten , and Nefertiti was henceforth known as Neferneferuaten-Nefertiti. The name change was a sign of the ever-increasing importance of the cult of the Aten.

It changed Egypt's religion from a polytheistic religion to a religion which may have been better described as a monolatry the depiction of a single god as an object for worship or henotheism one god, who is not the only god.

The boundary stelae of years 4 and 5 mark the boundaries of the new city and suggest that the move to the new city of Akhetaten occurred around that time.

The new city contained several large open-air temples dedicated to the Aten. Nefertiti and her family would have resided in the Great Royal Palace in the centre of the city and possibly at the Northern Palace as well.

Nefertiti and the rest of the royal family feature prominently in the scenes at the palaces and in the tombs of the nobles.

Nefertiti's steward during this time was an official named Meryre II. He would have been in charge of running her household. The people of Kharu the north and Kush the south are shown bringing gifts of gold and precious items to Akhenaten and Nefertiti.

In the tomb of Meryre II , Nefertiti's steward, the royal couple is shown seated in a kiosk with their six daughters in attendance. Two representations of Nefertiti that were excavated by Flinders Petrie appear to show Nefertiti in the middle to later part of Akhenaten's reign 'after the exaggerated style of the early years had relaxed somewhat'.

Another is a small inlay head Petrie Museum Number UC modeled from reddish-brown quartzite that was clearly intended to fit into a larger composition.

Meketaten may have died in year 13 or Nefertiti, Akhenaten, and three princesses are shown mourning her. It dates to year 16 of the king's reign and is also the last dated inscription naming the king.

Many scholars believe Nefertiti had a role elevated from that of Great Royal Wife , and was promoted to co-regent by her husband Pharaoh Akhenaten before his death.

It is also possible that, in a similar fashion to Hatshepsut, Nefertiti disguised herself as a male and assumed the male alter-ego of Smenkhkare ; in this instance she could have elevated her daughter Meritaten to the role of Great Royal Wife.

If Nefertiti did rule Egypt as Pharaoh, it has been theorized that she would have attempted damage control and may have re-instated the Ancient Egyptian religion and the Amun priests, and had Tutankhamun raised in with the traditional gods.

Archaeologist and Egyptologist Dr. Zahi Hawass theorized that Nefertiti returned to Thebes from Amarna to rule as Pharaoh, based on ushabti and other feminine evidence of a female Pharaoh found in Tutankhamun's tomb , as well as evidence of Nefertiti smiting Egypt's enemies which was a duty reserved to kings.

Pre Egyptological theories thought that Nefertiti vanished from the historical record around Year 12 of Akhenaten's reign, with no word of her thereafter.

Conjectured causes included injury, a plague that was sweeping through the city, and a natural cause. This theory was based on the discovery of several ushabti fragments inscribed for Nefertiti now located in the Louvre and the Brooklyn Museum.

A previous theory that she fell into disgrace was discredited when deliberate erasures of monuments belonging to a queen of Akhenaten were shown to refer to Kiya instead.

By the twelfth year of his reign, there is evidence she may have been elevated to the status of co-regent: [27] equal in status to the pharaoh, as may be depicted on the Coregency Stela.

It is possible that Nefertiti is the ruler named Neferneferuaten. Some theorists believe that Nefertiti was still alive and held influence on the younger royals.

In that year, Tutankhaten changed his name to Tutankhamun. This is evidence of his return to the official worship of Amun , and abandonment of Amarna to return the capital to Thebes.

In , the discovery of an inscription dated to Year 16, month 3 of Akhet , day 15 of the reign of Akhenaten was announced. This inscription offers incontrovertible evidence that both Akhenaten and Nefertiti were still alive in the 16th year of his [Akhenaten's] reign and, more importantly, that they were still holding the same positions as at the start of their reign.

This makes it necessary to rethink the final years of the Amarna Period. This means that Nefertiti was alive in the second to last year of Akhenaten's reign, and demonstrates that Akhenaten still ruled alone, with his wife by his side.

Therefore, the rule of the female Amarna pharaoh known as Neferneferuaten must be placed between the death of Akhenaten and the accession of Tutankhamun.

This female pharaoh used the epithet 'Effective for her husband' in one of her cartouches, [24] which means she was either Nefertiti or her daughter Meritaten who was married to king Smenkhkare.

Nefertiti's burial was intended to be made within the Royal Tomb as laid out in the Boundary Stelae. One shabti is known to have been made for her.

In , English archaeologist Nicholas Reeves announced that he had discovered evidence in high resolution scans of Tutankhamun's tomb "indications of two previously unknown doorways, one set within a larger partition wall and both seemingly untouched since antiquity To the north [there] appears to be signaled a continuation of tomb KV62 , and within these uncharted depths an earlier royal interment — that of Nefertiti herself.

A third radar scan has eliminated the possibility that there are any hidden chambers. These two mummies, known as ' The Elder Lady ' and ' The Younger Lady ', were identified as likely candidates of her remains.

More evidence to support this identification was that the mummy's teeth look like that of a to year-old, Nefertiti's most likely age of death.

Also, unfinished busts of Nefertiti appear to resemble the mummy's face, though other suggestions included Ankhesenamun. However, it eventually became apparent that the 'Elder Lady' is in fact Queen Tiye , mother of Akhenaten.

A lock of hair found in a coffinette bearing an inscription naming Queen Tiye proved a near perfect match to the hair of the 'Elder Lady'.

On June 9, , archaeologist Joann Fletcher , a specialist in ancient hair from the University of York in England, announced that Nefertiti's mummy may have been the Younger Lady.

Fletcher suggested that Nefertiti was the Pharaoh Smenkhkare. Some Egyptologists hold to this view though the majority believe Smenkhkare to have been a separate person.

Fletcher led an expedition funded by the Discovery Channel to examine what they believed to have been Nefertiti's mummy.

The team claimed that the mummy they examined was damaged in a way suggesting the body had been deliberately desecrated in antiquity.

A total eclipse occurred on May 13, BCE, and Egypt fell into darkness for more than five minutes. The effect on the pharaoh, his family, and his kingdom is unknown but may have been seen as an omen.

Akhenaten died in during the 17th year of his reign. The scholars who suggest Nefertiti was Akhenaten's co-king also suggest the pharaoh that followed Akhenaten was Nefertiti, under the name of Ankhkheperure Smenkhkare.

Smenkhkare took two wives—Nefertiti's daughters Meritaten and Ankhesenpaaten—and abandoned the city of Akhetaten, bricking up the temples and houses of the city and moving back to Thebes.

All the old cities were revived, and the cult statues of Mut, Amun, Ptah, and Nefertum and other traditional gods were reinstalled, and artisans were sent out to repair the chisel marks.

She or he may also well have selected the next sovereign, Tutankhaten—a boy of just 7 or 8 who was too young to rule. His sister Ankhesenpaaten was tapped to watch over him.

Smenkhkare's rule was short, and Tutankhaten was left to complete the re-establishment of the old religion under the name of Tutankhamen. He married Ankhesenpaaten and changed her name to Ankhesenamun: she, the last member of the 18th dynasty and Nefertiti's daughter, would outlive Tutankhamen and end up married to the first of the 19th dynasty kings, Ay.

Tutankhamen's mother is noted in records as a woman named Kiya, who was another wife of Akhenaten.

Her hair was styled in the Nubian fashion, perhaps indicating her origin. Some images a drawing , a tomb scene point to the pharaoh mourning her death in childbirth.

Images of Kiya were, at some later time, destroyed. DNA evidence has surfaced a new theory about Nefertiti's relationship to Tutankhamen "King Tut" —he was clearly the child of incest.

This evidence might suggest that Nefertiti was the mother of Tutankhamen and a first cousin of Akhenaten; or that Nefertiti was his grandmother, and Tutankhamen's mother was not Kiya but one of Nefertiti's daughters.

Share Flipboard Email. Jone Johnson Lewis. Women's History Writer. Jone Johnson Lewis is a women's history writer who has been involved with the women's movement since the late s.

She is a former faculty member of the Humanist Institute. Cooney, Kara. Hawass, Z. If we're not talking about the Helenistic dynasty the line of Cleopatras and Ptolenmys I don't want to hear about them being white.

And even then, because of Alexander the Great's conquest of Egypt, Cleopatra came from a long line of inbred Greeks and Macedonians. Yet, The cover art lied to me.

Yet, Moran has characters who are inexplicably blue eyed, red-headed before there is any influence from the countries that would become Europe.

All the same, for a first novel it wasn't bad. It follows Mutnodjmet the sister to Nefertiti. Our narrator-protagonist comes from a family that has long sense given daughters to kings of Egypt for marriage.

She is kind and honest individual who has a talent for gardening and an intellect for medical herbs. Easy to feel for we watch as her sister's selfishness take her further and further away from the things she wants- a peaceful life and a family of her own.

At times it was very suspenseful especially when the court politics explode in standoffs against the paranoid and ruthless Pharoah Akhenaten.

But the story misses opportunities for gripping battles and some characters that could have been actual threats fizzle away without much mention.

Also, I never felt I really got to understand why Nefertiti was great enough to deserve to be the titular character; it would have been nice to see how she redeems herself.

However, from the start, she is clearly cunning, bright, and there are many surprising moments of how she slowly steals the affection of the king away from his first wife and eventually becomes co-reagent.

It does paint the palace life very well, but I wish I would have seen more of what the village life in Egypt was like. You do not get much sense of the people's unrest with the current rule, you just keep hearing about it.

Overall, the payoff is tremendous, and the major character wrap up nicely. I would recommend it. It sticks fairly close to Historical accuracy Nov 16, Ivana Books Are Magic rated it did not like it.

So even if I ignore the fact that this novel pays attention to history and culture as much as an average Hollywood blockbuster meaning not at all , I cannot ignore the fact that the story itself is not very good.

It was boring to read, more than a little naive and the characters weren't appealing either. In a film, you at least have visual means to entertain your audience and hide any plot deficiencies.

In a novel, it all comes to writing. If the plot is not well written or developed and the writing is not successful- well, then it's not a very good novel.

Add stereotypes and cardboard characters to the mix and you end up with a disaster. I can believe that the author tried and researched, I'm not going to claim that she didn't put any effort into this.

Perhaps what's missing is just writing talent or experience. Not that should be any excuse. We might just as well hand out the following instruction to aspiring writers and publishers: 'How to take a famous historical characters and get away with lazy writing.

She always seemed sophisticated to me-or rather her image as portrayed in art. Well, imagination is a personal thing. Everyone can see the past differently.

I could have accepted Nefertiti as a villain only if she had been better written. None of the characters in this book are well developed and I guess that is what really bothers me.

Everyone is entitled to their own version of history. Not every historical fiction needs to be historically accurate.

Nevertheless, one should give his vision to a good editor if one is going to publish his book- or at least read it a few times.

This book is filled with illogical plot twists and moralizing. I'm not saying that the author didn't try to breathe life in this story, there are even a few really good lines in this book.

However, for a novel this long, one expects more. This is one of those books that have not lived up to its potential mostly because they are not well developed.

Even if I ignore the fact that the story does not sound plausible historically, I cannot ignore the fact that it has its weaknesses, a fair share of them actually.

I don't expect it to be a historical book, it's after all fiction but many things just don't sound right.

Here are my main issues with this book: 1. The novel does not have a feeling of a time different from our own.

The cultural undertones in it are for most parts the modern western culture. The historical facts and information that are in the novel are not woven into story in a natural and effortless way like in some other historical fictions.

I had a feeling they are there just to be there. There was some progress made into this direction. Regrettably, it was towards the end of the novel.

Again, I did not expect the novel to feel really authentic, but I did expect it to pay more attention to the way things might have been.

Perhaps we cannot reconstruct a culture so far away in time, but you can accomplish portraying a culture that feels a bit different. I mean you can, if you can write.

There is no attention to detail. Who edited this book? How can a woman be pregnant for two years? The characterization is not consistent, nor is the story itself.

Can Nefertiti influence her husband or not? I doubt even author knew answers to some of the questions that appear as you read. If you are to keep your characters mysterious, you have to add some dept to them.

One more thing that comes to my mind: you can not heal seriously ill people with mint tea. This book desperately needed good editing.

That's too bad, because it could have been much better. Do all the characters have to be so one-dimensional, so that a protagonist can be more sympathetic?

The author did try to add some dept to them as the novel progresses but it was not really successful. Again, there is no attention to details.

Sentimentality that appears occasionally does not help, rather just the opposite. The sort of action that can make you turn pages with interest begins at the end or towards the end- It was about page that I began to be interested.

That may not be the case with everybody, but really for me only half of the novel is any good. By any good I mean interesting, not even particularly good literature.

My recommendation is- read this book if you have nothing better to read or do. It could be a decent read if you're type that doesn't pay great attention to detail when you read.

You might like it if you don't know much about history or don't care about characters development. I can imagine someone liking it, but not very much.

Honestly, this book didn't appeal to me at all. I remember Nefertiti as a shallow and illogical novel.

I have no desire to reread it. One star. Sep 22, Caitlin rated it it was amazing Shelves: books-i-loved , favorites , historical-fiction , egypt , adult-fiction.

Why have I waited so long to read this book? No need for a lengthy review. I don't have anything to say that isn't already said in the thousands of reviews this book has.

I devoured this book in about 24 hours. It was addicting. Egypt, BCE. Fifteen year old Nefertiti and her thirteen year old sister, Mutnodjmet, are the daughters and only children of the Vizier Ay, brother to the Queen of Egypt, Tiye.

The prince of Egypt and Pharaoh's heir, Tuthmosis, is dead - possibly murdered by his younger and much less liked brother, Amunhotep. Both Ay and Tiye need Nefertiti to control Amunhotep, who talks wildly of worshipping Aten, the Sun, over all other gods, and has grandiose and impractical dreams.

But Nefertiti is far from secure in her position as Chief Wife. Amunhotep's first wife, Kiya, has given him a son, and Nefertiti exerts all her cunning to keep her upper hand - which of necessity involves aiding Amunhotep in his wild schemes.

Becoming king of Lower Egypt, he uses the army to strip Amun's temples and high priests of all their gold and treasures, forces them to convert to the worship of Aten, and as soon as his father dies and he becomes Pharaoh of all Egypt, uses the army to build a brand new city in the desert to worship the sun.

The Hittites are encroaching on Egyptian territory; Amunhotep - who becomes Akhenaten - becomes more and more paranoid and obsessive; and Kiya's father, the Vizier and now High Priest of Aten, Panahesi, scheming to raise his family higher.

Nefertiti, her father and the dowager queen Tiye are entirely occupied with politics and placating Akhenaten, who refuses to send troops to protect Egypt's borders.

Akhenaten and Nefertiti's ambitions raise them to god status, as their statues and likenesses decorate temples and buildings like no rulers before, and Akhenaten becomes more and more unstable.

Caught between them all is Nefertiti's sister Mutny, torn between sisterly love and a yearning for her own life free of the palace and its dangers.

Everything reaches boiling point when Akhenaten does something incredibly stupid, and Egypt itself teeters on the brink of ruin.

I was surprised to find that Mutny narrates this tale, since it is titled "Nefertiti", but it was a good move on Moran's part - Mutny is a quiet, in-the-background character but she is a much more sympathetic character, has a wiser perspective because she's not blinded by Nefertiti's ambition and power, and is much more relatable because she's more humble.

Nefertiti, as presented in this book anyway, is too lofty a personage to get inside her head. Where this novel works is with Mutnodjmet and her love for General Nakhtmin, her observations and conscience.

She's knowable and likeable for all that she's coming from a drastically different culture. As a window into Egyptian culture in the 14th century BCE, it also works quite well, but it never feels truly authentic.

There's a modern touch at work, coming through in Moran's prose, that makes it read more like a fantasy book set in a "different" world, than a work of historical fiction.

Since there's not a whole lot to go on, research-wise, Moran has done well to reconstruct the world and its people, but not being an Egyptian history scholar at all, I can't vouch for its accuracy and there are probably better books in this regard.

While I did like the book, I also found it hard to get into at times. I had to force myself to sit down and finish it, and this comes down mostly to the style of prose - it's simple, it's readable, it's perfectly fine, but there was too much distance between me and the narrator.

The author never really immersed herself deeply enough, leaving the book to skim the surface of an arresting tale. It's hard to pinpoint it any better than that.

The characters were no more familiar, understandable or knowable by the end than they were at the beginning.

It was a tantalising taste, but I wanted the entire dish. Mar 23, Trupti Dorge rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , i-own , review-copy.

Tuthmosis, the older brother of Amunhotep is dead and the wise men of Egypt have concluded that Amunhotep has killed his brother for power, to become the pharaoh.

And as the author Michelle Moran puts it Whatever the truth, that night the crown prince, Tuthmosis, dies, and a new crown prince rose to take his place.

Her father is a vizier to the pharaoh, so we get to know both sides of politics. Nefertiti is very ambitious and is ready to assist the pharaoh in his heretic ambitious.

He destroys all the temples built for Amun and forbids his people from worshipping him. He builds an entirely new city called Amarna and glorifies himself and his queen Nefertiti by carving their statues and painting their faces everywhere.

Nefertiti does not stop Amunhotep because she realizes that it was the only opportunity to make herself immortal and be remembered through centuries.

Like the pharaoh, she turns a blind eye on the political unrest, encroaching enemies and devotes herself entirely to the pharaoh and her ambitions.

It is the story of her sister Mutnodjmet Mutny too. In fact I was surprised to find that the narrator is Mutny. She is the exact opposite of Nefertiti.

Where Nefertiti wants power, Mutny wants a quiet life in one of the villages, away from all the politics. The story and the backdrop are interesting; yes, but what brings life to the story are the characters.

I loved how author Michelle Moran has constructed a story around an era which is still not entirely explored. Weaving a story around a civilization and characters as ancient as these, must have required a lot of research.

Nefertiti is a good thriller and a good story which kept me up late turning the pages. Rating: 4. View 1 comment. Apr 01, Christine rated it it was ok Shelves: poc-on-cover , minority-and-women-writers , historical-ancient-egypt.

It's not a bad book, but it's not Pauline Gedge. Narrator here is too much of a prefect princess. However, Moran does get points for research.

Sep 15, Cfleff rated it did not like it. Contrary to what some other reviewers have said, I found this to be a very poorly-researched book.

While there is, of course, very little information available about the personalities of people who lived so long ago, there is certainly a good deal of information about this period and these people, from which one can draw some intelligent inferences about what they were like, as people.

And these characters simply do not fit the available historical data. Nefertiti, for example, is portrayed by M Contrary to what some other reviewers have said, I found this to be a very poorly-researched book.

Nefertiti, for example, is portrayed by Moran as ruthlessly seeking power at any cost - not a very likable person.

Yet she was much admired by the kings and ambassadors of surrounding countries; and her husband speaks of her "sweet voice" and "gentle hands" - hardly attributes of the kind of virago portrayed in this book!

And to me, when I look at the famous bust by the artist Thutmose, I see a woman who has seen a good deal of sadness - after all, at least four of her six daughters died before her, as well as her husband.

And as for her half- sister, Mutnodjmet, there is absolutely nothing whatsoever in the historical record to suggest that she was any sort of intellectual or that she had an altruistic bone in her body, let alone that she ever had any desire to become a physician.

On the contrary, if you want to picture either of these two sisters as a ruthless social-climber, I would nominate Mutnodjmet.

Despite being born non-royal, the daughter of her father's second, lower-ranking wife, she managed to become queen by virtue of marrying Horemheb, usurper of the throne of Egypt at the end of the Eighteenth Dynasty!

I would say that that record speaks for itself! In short, I think this is a very poorly-researched book that doesn't do justice to a fascinating, colorful period in Egyptian history or the people who made it that way, filled with unrealistic, unlikable, two-dimensional characters.

If you're a fan of ancient Egypt and want a well-researched, accurate portrayal of Nefertiti and her life and times, check out C.

Dec 06, Lynn rated it liked it Recommends it for: people who are bored. At first the back cover had me ready to read when I saw "meticulously researched" stated by the Boston Globe's review on the back.

I tore through it in 9 hours because it was such an easy read. While the story was decent, I was rather disappointed. Although her character portrayal was good, she never really made me SEE Egypt.

It also lacked the one thing every other "meticulously researched" book on ancient Egypt lacks. If it was so w At first the back cover had me ready to read when I saw "meticulously researched" stated by the Boston Globe's review on the back.

If it was so well researched, then why the heck can't authors get that right? I also found inconsistencies in the 'research'. I've independently studies Egypt my entire life, I doubt the author spent more than a year, two at most, researching.

Certain items she used in the story didn't even exist in Ancient Egypt. It was riddle with "ly". I was say, read it if you're bored. Well, that's my two cents.

View all 3 comments. Aug 18, Christine rated it it was amazing. I am still reeling from this delicious book!

Power, royalty, wealth and a sweet love story all rolled into one, this book swept me up and did not put me down until the last page of the preview to the sequel.

Told through the eyes of Nefertiti's younger sister, Mutnodjmet, who was the exact opposite of her - but both were compelling and strong characters.

I couldn't help but liken Nefertiti to Anne Boleyn: both driven by their families and their own ambitions for power, both used religion to seal I am still reeling from this delicious book!

I couldn't help but liken Nefertiti to Anne Boleyn: both driven by their families and their own ambitions for power, both used religion to seal the fates of their relationships, and both supported and tolerated an unstable king, making foolish decisions along the way to hold on to their positions.

Mary Boleyn could be easliy compared to Mutnodjmet: both quietly beautiful and bound to their sister queens even though they were used and treated as servants, they each desired life outside of court and finally achieved that, but neither of them ever betrayed their families in the process, loyal to the end.

Shelves: Beste Spielothek in Kapf findenfiction. Moran, by saying that Ay deals with most government affairs, shoots herself in the foot really, because we must then put the disasters of governance down to Ay's incompetence. I loved how Nefertiti Michelle Moran has constructed a story around an era which is still not entirely explored. I would Beste Spielothek in Theissing finden put this on my educational shelf but I'm just not certain I believe all the egyptian details within. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. FuГџball Polen Irland to Read Currently Reading Read. It sticks fairly close to Historical accuracy If you are to keep your characters mysterious, you have to add some dept to them. February 17, While Nefertiti story was Fairy Tail Tuber, I was rather disappointed. Akhenaten had an extensive Bundesligavereine, which included two of his daughters with Nefertiti, Meritaten and Ankhesenpaaten. Collection: Ägyptisches Beste Spielothek in Urlau finden Berlin, Inv. Ancient Egypt. An den rekonstruierten Ecken des Steinsarkophages ihres Gatten wurde sie als dessen Schutzgöttin dargestellt. Tweets Tatort Ägypten: Der Fall Nofretete. Ein Ziel ist es, eines breiten Spektrums von Demonstrationsveranstaltungen zu unterstützen. Juni Es gibt viele verschiedene Arten Termin Champions League Finale Demonstrationsveranstaltungen, aber allen gemeinsam ist, dass sie auf einer bestimmten Art von Wissensaustausch basieren: von Landwirt zu Landwirt und von Landwirt zu Innovationsakteuren. Lebensräume — Lebensbilder — Weltbilder. Sie finden sich bereits bei Amenophis III. Namensräume Artikel Diskussion. Online Casino Legal In Deutschland - 12 Niederlande - 7 Polen - 8 Spanien - 6. Beste Spielothek in Schnatzling findenBandNr. Sie wurde zu einer Art Mitregentin Spiele Volcano - Video Slots Online und zumindest symbolisch mit der pharaonischen Macht ausgestattet. Andere Quellen vermuten ihren Tod im In den Porträtdarstellungen werden zwei Ayondo Erfahrungen unterschieden, die sich deutlich voneinander Nefertiti. So trägt sie in einigen Abbildungen weiterhin die dreiteilige Frauenperücke, die Hathorkrone mit Sonnenscheibe und Kuhhörnern, die nubische Perücke oder den für Königinnen Schweizer Casinos Doppeluräus.

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